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Rotator Cuff Tear INR   0 INR  0
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Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff muscles are a group of four muscles that pass from the shoulder blade (scapula) and attach to the top of the ball joint (humerus). These muscles are responsible for rotation and elevation of the arm.FROZEN SHOULDER Rotator cuff tears are very common, especially as we all get older. They frequently cause pain over the upper arm that is made worse by overhead activities, reaching behind your back and lifting. They often ache at night and people find that they are unable to lie on the injured shoulder. They also cause weakness. Rotator cuff tears most frequently occur with general wear and tear, and most people usually don’t remember injuring their shoulder. These “degenerative tears”, if not associated with arm weakness, may be successfully treated without surgery. This involves avoiding overhead activities, regular simple pain relief and gentle physiotherapy. Anti-inflammatory steroid injections can be very helpful in these situations to help manage pain and discomfort. When symptoms fail to improve despite these measures, surgical repair of the tear is indicated. The less common group of rotator cuff tears occur following an injury, and are called “traumatic tears”. People usually remember the exact incident, and often have significant weakness after the injury. Early surgical repair is often indicated. SUMMARY OF TREATMENT OPTIONS Simple pain relief e.g. regular paracetamol, ibuprofen. Physiotherapy: to maintain range of movement and strength. Anti-inflammatory steroid injections: to assist with pain relief. Note that excessive use of cortisone may cause more harm than good. Surgical repair is indicated in 2 circumstances: Following an injury (Acute tear). Degenerative tears that continue to be painful despite regular analgesia, physiotherapy and steroid injections. Injection PRP for partial tears.ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR As a rule of thumb, rotator cuff tears will not heal on their own, and can only do so if a surgical repair is performed. A repair involves re-attaching the torn tendon to bone (humerus) using sutures and anchors. This operation is usually done under general anaesthesia, and may be performed as an open technique or arthroscopically (keyhole surgery). Arthroscopic repair is more technically demanding than open surgery, but this method has advantages including less pain, smaller wounds and lower risk of post-operative infection. Not all tears can be repaired. Risks of surgery include infection, stiffness, ongoing pain and weakness, re-tear of the tendon repair, and very rarely, nerve injury. The risk of the repair tearing again is much greater with large tears and with increasing age (over 70 years of age). Even if the repair does tear again, most people experience an improvement in their pain. The risk of ongoing pain at 12 months following the surgery is approximately 10 to 15%. Antibiotics are given at the time of surgery to minimize the risk of infection. Despite this, infection of the wounds can occur. This is usually easily treated with antibiotics. However, sometimes the infection gets into the joint which is a serious complication and requires re-admission to hospital, additional surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Most patients experience improved shoulder strength and less pain following rotator cuff repair, and each technique has similar medium to long-term results. Factors that decrease the likelihood of a satisfactory result include: Large / massive tears. Patient age (older than 65 years). Poor compliance with restrictions and rehabilitation following surgery. Smoking. Poor tissue quality. Workers compensation claims. Recovery following surgery usually involves staying one night in hospital, and being in a sling for 6 weeks. Most people can drive a car after 6 to 8 weeks. Rehabilitation guidelines to share with your physiotherapist are provided following the surgery, and vary according to the type and size of tear that is repaired. Recovery may take 6 to 12 months, depending on the severity of the tear.

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Total Hip Replacement INR   0 INR  0
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Total Hip Replacement

The operation of a total hip replacement is a well established, long lasting procedure for relieving the pain involved with hip arthritis. This type of surgery has been used effectively now for over 40 years and remains the treatment of choice to achieve an excellent quality of life for sufferers of hip arthritis.THE PROCEDURE ANAESTHETIC The type of anaesthetic that is used for the procedure will vary according to each patient’s co-existent medical conditions and also your wishes. Our group of anaesthetists are all competent in both general and regional (spinal) anaesthetics and will discuss with you prior to the procedure the benefits and risks of each technique. SURGERY Through an incision approximately 12-15cm long centred over the side of the hip and curving gently towards the buttock, the hip joint can be entered with minimal trauma to the surrounding muscles. The hip is dislocated and the femur bone is cut through its neck to expose both the pelvic and leg sides of the joint. Depending upon the quality of the bone and the age of the patient either a cemented or cementless component is fixed to the pelvis and similarly to the femur. The ball and socket mechanism of the joint is then reconstructed with either a metal on plastic (polyethylene) articulation or ceramic on ceramic articulation. Computer navigation may be used to ensure that the leg length obtained is correct and the orientation of the components is optimal to provide for maximum range of motion of the new hip. Following the surgery you will be able to mobilize fully weight bearing on the hip the day after the procedure. You will be aided by the physiotherapist and nursing staff and taught how to safely use a frame initially and then graduate onto crutches. Your hospital stay will be between 5-7 days and depending upon your home supports and progress. Most people will be able to dispense with their crutches approximately 4-6 weeks following the surgery. During this time period you should sleep flat on your back, not cross your legs and use a seat raise for the toilet. These precautions will be emphasised by the physiotherapist during your hospital stay.All our patients are routinely put on home based physiotherapy post discharge. AFTER DISCHARGE Driving the car is not allowed for 6 weeks following the surgery and car travel as a passenger should be minimised during this period. These restrictions minimise the chance of the hip dislocating whilst the muscles and soft tissues around your hip heal. At 6 weeks following the procedure you will be reviewed by your surgeon. Most patients are then given the all clear to return to recreational walking, swimming, cycling, golf, tennis, bowls, gymnasium workouts and other recreational pursuits as desired. It is not advised that you undertake running or jumping activities following a hip replacement. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What are the risks involved with the procedure? There are general risks associated with any surgery, these are those of the anaesthetic (please speak to your anaesthetist prior to the operation), bleeding, blood clots (deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolization (PE)), infection and vascular injury. Specific to the surgery are the risks of dislocation of the hip prosthesis, leg length inequality, fracture of the pelvis or femur, wear and loosening of the implants, audible ‘squeaking’ of the articulating components (ceramics), nerve injury. When can I return to work? Most people should be able to return to work at 6 weeks post-surgery. This may be extended if you perform a job involving heavy manual labour. When can I resume sexual activity? Sexual intercourse can safely be undertaken 6 weeks following the surgery. How long do I need to keep taking pain-killing medicine for? When you leave the hospital you will be given tablet analgesia for pain. You should take this for as long as you have pain when walking or at night. Most people are able to cease analgesics by 4 weeks following the surgery. Do I need to do physiotherapy when I go home? You will be given a sheet of exercises from the physiotherapist when you leave the hospital. You should do these exercises as instructed. You do not need to visit a physiotherapist once discharged.

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Osteoarthritis of the Knee INR   0 INR  0
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Osteoarthritis of the Knee

KNEE Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common condition and is becoming an increasingly important problem for the community as a whole. In the normal knee joint the ends of the bones are covered with a type of gristle called articular cartilage. This surface has special characteristics that make it an ideal bearing surface. The articular cartilage needs to be distinguished from the meniscus, commonly called “the cartilage” The meniscus is like a gasket around the margins of the joint and fills in the gap between the rounded end of the femur and the relatively flat surface of the tibia. Osteoarthritis is a condition where the articular cartilage breaks down and is essentially worn away leaving the underlying bone exposed. On an X-ray this appears as a loss of the space between bones. There are many factors that can contribute to the development of osteoarthritis. Some individuals probably have a hereditary predisposition to the condition, as it does seem to run in some families. Females are more at risk of developing osteoarthritis than males. Obesity is a very important contributory factor as the biomechanics of the knee are such that the effect of extra weight is magnified in the knee joint. The effect is like a stiletto heel, where all the force goes through a very small area. Injuries to the knee can also contribute to the development of osteoarthritis. Such injuries include damage to the meniscus or articular surface itself and a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament. The treatment of osteoarthritis depends on the severity of the condition, the symptoms, the lifestyle of the individual, as well as their age and general health. In general, treatment can be divided into non-surgical and surgical options. As a basic principle it is always better to try all non-surgical options before proceeding down a surgical path. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT SIMPLE MEASURES Strengthen thigh muscles. Lose weight. Analgesics. Non-surgical treatment starts with ensuring that there is adequate strength in the muscles around the knee and in particular the quadriceps muscle at the front of the thigh, and getting one's weight back to a normal level. Obviously it is difficult for many patients with osteoarthritis of the knee to exercise because of their pain. However, riding an exercise bike is a good way of strengthening the quadriceps muscle and at the same time burning calories, which will help in efforts to lose weight. However, dietary intake also needs to be modified and it may be helpful to seek specific advice from a dietician. As one loses weight and builds up strength in the quadriceps muscle it generally becomes easier to walk and this in turn will help with losing weight. Using simple painkillers can be a very effective way of relieving symptoms and improving function. Paracetamol should be the mainstay of pain relief. Various formulations are available but the basic principle is that the total dose should not exceed 4 grams per day (8 standard 500mg tablets). It is often helpful to take a larger dose (1000 - 1500 mg) in the morning and again at night. This will help get over morning stiffness and pain and relieve night pain, two of the most troublesome symptoms of osteoarthritis. OTHER OPTIONS Anti-inflammatories. Nutraceuticals (glucosamine, chondroitin sulphate, fish oil, Lyprinol). Cortisone injection. Viscosupplementation. Anti-inflammatory medications can also provide good relief of symptoms, both pain and swelling. However, they can all be associated with significant side-effects including indigestion and stomach ulcers, aggravation of high blood pressure and heart disease, and impairment of kidney function. They should therefore not be used indiscriminately and preferably only for short-term benefit. If your knee causes you most difficulty with activities such as golf or tennis, one strategy is to take anti-inflammatory medication on the day you are playing sport and perhaps the following day but then not again until you play sport the next time. There are a number of so-called nutraceutical preparations that have become very popular. These include glucosamine, chondroitin sulphate, fish oil and green-lipped mussel extract (Lyprinol). Some individuals find that they get good relief from these types of preparations but it is difficult to predict who will respond positively to them. At present there is little in the way of good quality scientific evidence to support their use. Fortunately they do not seem to have any significant side effects, so there is little harm in trying them. It would seem logical to try only one at a time. If it is unclear whether the preparation is helping, then it is probably worth taking it for 3 to 4 months and then ceasing it. If your symptoms do not deteriorate once you stop taking the preparation then there is little reason to recommence it. There is no convincing evidence to suggest that one formulation of glucosamine is better than another, or whether the addition of chondroitin sulphate provides an additional benefit. There are two groups of injections that can also be used in the treatment of the osteoarthritis. The first are cortisone preparations and these can be used for the relief of an exacerbation of symptoms, particularly if there is significant swelling. It is probably not a good idea to have a lot of injections of cortisone into the knee, as each injection is associated with a very small risk of infection of the joint. The second group of injections are the so-called viscosupplements. These are basically preparations of hyaluronic acid, which is one of the substances that make up the articular cartilage. There is some evidence to indicate that the use of viscosupplementation provides relief that is similar to that achieved with the use of anti-inflammatory medication or cortisone injections for up to 3 to 6 months. It is very important to realise that the use of anti-inflammatory tablets, cortisone injections, or viscosupplementation does not affect the progression of osteoarthritis in the longer term. These options are simply to provide relief of pain. SURGICAL OPTIONS Surgical options can be divided into three groups: arthroscopy, realignment procedures, and joint replacement. Whilst arthroscopy is a relatively small and simple procedure and the idea of a “clean-up” operation seems attractive, there is increasing evidence to suggest that the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of the osteoarthritis provides little benefit compared to non-surgical options over a period of a couple of years. It does however still have a role in some situations. It seems to work better if there is swelling of the knee. It can be useful to address associated pathology such as a tear of the meniscus. It can also be useful by allowing unstable articular cartilage to be removed along with fragments floating in the joint. Once again, an arthroscopy is only aimed at relieving symptoms and does nothing to slow the progression of the osteoarthritis. Indeed, it occasionally seems to aggravate the process and may bring on the need for a knee replacement more quickly than if the arthroscopy had not been performed all. Realignment procedures are called osteotomies. These involve cutting the tibia or femur bone and changing the overall alignment of the leg to make it more “knock-kneed” or sometimes more “bow-legged”. The aim is to take weight away from the part of the knee that is affected by osteoarthritis. Such procedures can only be used in certain patterns of osteoarthritis and are better suited to people under the age of 55. They can however provide good long-term relief and put off the need for joint replacement, whilst at the same time allowing an individual to remain quite active. Replacement involves shaping or cutting the bone ends and applying a metal or polyethylene component to the surface. Usually both sides of the joint are replaced. One can either replace all parts of the knee, which is a total knee replacement or just one part of the knee, which is a partial replacement. Like osteotomies, partial replacement can only be used for certain patterns of osteoarthritis. In general we try to put off joint replacement procedures for as long as possible because of concerns about long-term wear and loosening. In addition, replacement procedures are only compatible with low impact sporting activities. Golf, social or doubles tennis, cycling, and snow skiing are reasonable whereas running, basketball, netball, or any type of football should not be considered, because of the risk of premature wear and loosening of the prosthesis

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